Science stories

Global threats and biodiversity

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Climate change, land-use change, pollution, exploitation of natural resources, and invasive species are transforming life on Earth as fast as never before in Earth's history. The exploration and understanding of biodiversity is therefore more important than ever. 

These drivers of global changes, known as the “big five”, do not affect every species or an ecosystem in every region in the same way. To determine how and why does for example pollution impact a dragonfly or invasive species impact silver birch forests, we need to ask ourselves what does a particular species/ecosystem need for survival.  More...

No species is an island

turtle1_hansen_webjpgIsland ecology, the study of relationships between organisms and their environment on islands, seeks to understand the vital connections between plants and animals and the world around them.

Through my research, I hope to exemplify that the protection of species occurring on islands and the web of life in which they are part of, depend vitally on the protection of the place where they live – their habitat. For my PhD I am working on an island ecosystem, Aldabra Atoll, a UNESCO World Heritage Site home to the largest population of giant tortoises in the world and constituting important natural habitats for in-situ conservation of threatened biological diversity.  More...

How to stay hidden or the importance of genetic diversity

Biston_betulariajpgThe peppered moth (aka Biston betularia) is an inconspicuous little insect that cryptically camouflages against the bark of birch trees during the day. There, it tries to stay out of sight of its many predators, like red breasts and black birds. The better an individual matches the background of the birch’s bark, the more likely it is to survive. Until fairly recently, the light colored wing patterns of most individuals of this species did exactly that: they enabled a moth to blend in and stay hidden. More...

Sounds under water                                                                                       

Clown_fish_in_the_Andaman_Coral_ReefjpgDid you know that fish make sounds? Not all, but many do. To communicate, they grunt, they moan, they squeak, they groan, they click. But they’re not the only living organisms to make sound at sea: marine mammals also do, of course, and with a good ear you could also catch snapping shrimps or munching urchins. That is, if there’s no motorboat passing by… Come to this busk to discover the symphony of biodiversity at sea and even join the harmony! Or if you really must, stay in your armchair and visit: https://dosits.org/galleries/audio-gallery/

Colors and spectrometry

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Compost, ecosystem services and biodiversity

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Dentition and biodiversity

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Dog domestication

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Forest and ecosystem services

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Fungus, caterpillars and human geography

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Microbe diversity

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Microorganisms food web in lakes

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Palm oil and habitat destruction

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Plant taxonomy

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Smells and biodiversity

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